Guest Book

It would be really helpful if the author of this website identified herself by name more prominently on the site's home page and elsewhere. The current website requires a treasure hunt to find Ms Poliquin's name.
March 8, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterTerry Belanger
Hello,

My name is Danny Ahlfeld and I am a new film maker in Chicago, and a actor. I am in the middle of drawing story boards for my newest short movie. I am also a Chicago Fire Fighter.
I am looking for a taxidermy dog either to rent or for sale. Is this possible?
I'd love to talk to you even if you can't help me, as I have a friend who works at the Field Museum in Chicago. He is currently doing research you might be interested in. I hope you can help, and now this e-mail will be on google. LOL.

Yours,

Danny Ahlfeld
November 4, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterDanny Ahlfeld
Dear Ravishing Beasts,

I wanted to let you know that this website has been a great source of inspiration and information, without of which I would have been unable to complete my university degree. I have now successfully completed a BA(hons) in graphic design and wanted to tell you about the creation of my major project titled - 'Taxidermy:A New Perspective'.

I designed an exhibition space and catalogue, all of which can be found here -
http://cargocollective.com/lucyhollidge/TAXIDERMY-A-NEW-PERSPECTIVE

Here is some information about the project:

Taxidermy: A New Perspective is an exhibition that challenges the public perception of the practice and on a wider level seeks to illustrate our tempestuous relationship with animals. This major project produced numerous outcomes including the exhibition catalogue, map, interior layout, advertising and additional information material, all of which share a contemporary minimal look to further dispel taxidermy stereotypes and present the antique subject in a new modern perspective. The use of hidden content, viewable only through red decoder glasses, re-enforced the main conceptual message of ‘looking differently’ and appreciating the animal in all forms, as well as the skill of the practice itself.

I wanted to share this with you because I am so grateful for this site. You have helped sculpt this project and I wanted to say a massive THANK YOU!

Thanks again,

Lucy Hollidge
October 14, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterLucy Hollidge
I bought a house that has a huge mounted elk on the wall, 11points and 46 inches wide. It's really nice, but I want to sell it to someone who can appreciate it. I live near Orlando, Florida. Do you have any suggestions?
July 14, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterPaul
Rachel,

I am about to graduate with a BFA in Furniture Design from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. I have used taxidermy in my thesis exhibition and would really like to know what you think about the work coming from someone with your experience. I have really appreciated your site throughout my studies. It would mean so much if I could send you some images and exchange a bit of conversation. Please contact me if you are interested!! I feel quite proud of the furniture, objects, and installation I have created.

Thank you for your time,
Morgan
April 30, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterMorgan Hill
Hi Rachel,
Just finished reading your book, The Breathless Zoo, and I must say I found it extremely well-written and even entertaining. I'm an artist about to embark on my own foray into using animal parts to highlight the tragedy of urban wildlife killed by cars. I decided to do some investigation into the cultural implications of taxidermy before making the leap. You pointed out very important points on the emotional subject, especially how changes in our culture over the centuries relates to changes in our responses to different forms of taxidermy. While reading the book, I often recall my own reactions to visits to the Field Museum in Chicago and to seeing other works of taxidermy in person over the years. Revulsion for poorly mounted specimens, sadness of knowing that now extinct species will only ever be known as lifeless forms, and the amazement of seeing these animals up close. The history of taxidermy is much richer than I had ever imagined, and I had thought anthropomorphized poses were newer; I had not known of Potter and his works, for example.
My main reason for writing this is to encourage you to continue this website and research and to not be disheartened by negative responses and those who are ignorant in thinking that you yourself participate in taxidermy. Your book and site are a valuable resource, and even the negative responses are valuable in highlighting the emotional side of stuffing dead animals. Readers like myself will have a much better understanding of the rich history and multiple layers of culture one takes on should they decide to undertake taxidermy as an art.
March 17, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJennifer
Nice blog with very good perspectives on taxidermy. We are a taxidermy company from Holland and we do a lot of (international) work for artist, museums and interiorcompanies.

We have read your blog with a lot of interest!

Kind regards,

de museumwinkel.com
http://demuseumwinkel.com/
February 4, 2013 | Unregistered Commenterde museumwinkel.com
Sorry, typo in the last post

http://sarahcusimanomiles.com/
January 27, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterSarah Cusimano Miles
Hi, Rachel,

I have been photographing in a Natural History Museum in Alabama for several years and it is so wonderful to see your site devoted to taxidermy! I am including my website in case you are interested in looking at it. Thanks for collecting all of this online where many can enjoy it!

Sincerely,
Sarah Cusimano Miles

http://www.sarahcusimanimiles.com
January 26, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterSarah Cusimano Miles
Hello, I'm currently writing a seminar paper on taxidermy and this website has been such a help with my research, so happy to have come across it!
keep up the good work :D
December 30, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterHarriet
Hi Rachel,

I'm working on my dissertation on the subject of the re-emergence of taxidermy within Fine Art - Have Breathless Zoo in front of me, its great. I requested our University in England to buy it - so it's now in their library. I'm referencing an image of Thomas Grünfelds, Misfit deer/giraffe - but I cant find when he made it. I know most of the series seem to be 1994, I don't suppose you know about this particular one? Thanks.

Belinda Thomas
December 18, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterBelinda Thomas
thanks for this
November 23, 2012 | Unregistered Commentereddie
On page 67 of "The Breathless Zoo" you wrote: "Perhaps the discovery of arsenic and the sheer quantity of taxidermy being produced explained the new vogue. ... Whatever the cause, by the mid-nineteenth century taxidermy had reached its apotheosis ... most particularly in England." This popularity (and practicality) was demonstrated by George Alfred Henty's boy's adventure book "By Sheer Pluck: a tale of the Ashanti War" (1884). The main character, a poor, orphan boy, comes to the attention of an African explorer who is captivated by his artistically-mounted birds in a taxidermy shop. The explorer invites the young lad to accompany him on his scientific expedition where he becomes involved in the Ashanti War.
November 19, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterDerek Wilson
Loved your interview on cbc with Michael Enright today and have ordered your book. I'm a fiction writer who has been interested in taxidermy for a long time...but lately have become more interested in the way we humans taxidermy ourselves to maintain our youthfulness. You mentioned your jackalope in the interview; I have a character who has become a jackalope through cosmetic surgery. It's in the title story of my Western Taxidermy collection. (That particular story can be found online at http://www.belletrista.com/2012/Issue17/features_3.php)

www.barbhoward.ca
November 18, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterBarb Howard
Do all these viewers know that Katinka Simonse actually TORTURES AND KILLS animals to make her so-called art? How is that okay with you people? How does that make her any different than Mike Vick who was running dog fighting rings and was finally brought to some justice, though not enough for me. This woman is sick. She is a sociopath. And she thinks it is funny. So what does that make people who appreciate her "art form"? --sick fucks, all of you.
November 6, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterE. Russell
Thanks for showing all this work! Excellent.
October 17, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterGerrit
A friend of mine referred me to your book a few weeks ago when I was installing a taxidermy show, I have not received my copy yet, but by looking at this site I can say that I am loving the fact that this work is becoming more and more experimental and recognized as valid art! It feels as though I might actually be at the right place at the right time for once. Keep it up! I have my own stuff up at http://meddlingwithnature.com/ as well as http://meddling-with-nature.deviantart.com/ if anyone is interested.

Thanks again for making such a mark.

-Jeremy
October 13, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterJeremy Johnson
great blog, I make faux taxidermy sculptures, heres one Ive just finished

http://cerealchillers.blogspot.co.nz/2012/08/loxy-fady-or-art-im-working-on-now.html
October 7, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterxtiaan
Kindred Souls ... Dr. Fragonard and You
September 25, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterCynthia Neal
Hi, I came across your site about an hour ago and I'm quite impressed! I wanted to see more so I purchased your book. I've always had a fascination with taxidermy but not until recently have I begun using it for artistic use and expression. I'm including a link to my Etsy shop in hopes of getting some feedback.

Much love and best of luck to you Rachel,

Myranda E.

Etsy.com/Shop/MyrandaE
September 24, 2012 | Unregistered Commentermyranda e

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